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Use of HOMA-IR to diagnose non-alcoholic fatty liver disease: a population-based and... Use of HOMA-IR to diagnose non-alcoholic fatty liver disease: a population-based and...

Date added: 05/27/2018
Date modified: 05/27/2018
Filesize: 256 Bytes
Downloads: 35

"Use of HOMA-IR to diagnose non-alcoholic fatty liver disease: a population-based and inter-laboratory study"

Aims/hypothesis
Recent European guidelines for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) call for reference values for HOMA-IR. In this study, we aimed to determine: (1) the upper limit of normal HOMA-IR in two population-based cohorts; (2) the HOMA-IR corresponding to NAFLD; (3) the effect of sex and PNPLA3 genotype at rs738409 on HOMA-IR; and (4) inter-laboratory variations in HOMA-IR.

Methods
We identified healthy individuals in two population-based cohorts (FINRISK 2007 [n = 5024] and the Programme for Prevention of Type 2 Diabetes in Finland [FIN-D2D; n = 2849]) to define the upper 95th percentile of HOMA-IR. Non-obese individuals with normal fasting glucose levels, no excessive alcohol use, no known diseases and no use of any drugs were considered healthy. The optimal HOMA-IR cut-off for NAFLD (liver fat ≥5.56%, based on the Dallas Heart Study) was determined in 368 non-diabetic individuals (35% with NAFLD), whose liver fat was measured using proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS). Samples from ten individuals were simultaneously analysed for HOMA-IR in seven European laboratories.

Results
The upper 95th percentiles of HOMA-IR were 1.9 and 2.0 in healthy individuals in the FINRISK (n = 1167) and FIN-D2D (n = 459) cohorts. Sex or PNPLA3 genotype did not influence these values. The optimal HOMA-IR cut-off for NAFLD was 1.9 (sensitivity 87%, specificity 79%). A HOMA-IR of 2.0 corresponded to normal liver fat (<5.56% on 1H-MRS) in linear regression analysis. The 2.0 HOMA-IR measured in Helsinki corresponded to 1.3, 1.6, 1.8, 1.8, 2.0 and 2.1 in six other laboratories. The inter-laboratory CV% of HOMA-IR was 25% due to inter-assay variation in insulin (25%) rather than glucose (5%) measurements.

Conclusions/interpretation
The upper limit of HOMA-IR in population-based cohorts closely corresponds to that of normal liver fat. Standardisation of insulin assays would be the first step towards definition of normal values for HOMA-IR.

The MBOAT7 variant rs641738 alters hepatic phosphatidylinositols and increases severity of NAFLD The MBOAT7 variant rs641738 alters hepatic phosphatidylinositols and increases severity of NAFLD

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Date added: 03/08/2017
Date modified: 03/08/2017
Filesize: 256 Bytes
Downloads: 909

We have recently shown in 125 subjects that insulin resistance and the PNPLA3 I148M gene variant, two common risk factors of NAFLD, are characterized with markedly different content and composition of lipids in the human liver. In 2015, a variant in membrane bound O-acyltransferase domain containing 7 (MBOAT7) at rs641738 was discovered to increase the risk of alcohol-related cirrhosis. This variant was also shown to increase the risk of steatosis and histologic liver damage in NAFLD, independent of obesity.

The genetics of Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: Spotlight on PNPLA3 & TM6SF2 The genetics of Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: Spotlight on PNPLA3 & TM6SF2

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Date added: 05/22/2016
Date modified: 05/22/2016
Filesize: 256 Bytes
Downloads: 1218

Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) encompasses a spectrum that spans simple steatosis, through non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) to fibrosis and ultimately cirrhosis. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease is characterized by substantial inter-patient variation in rate of progression and disease outcome: Although up to 25% of the general population are at risk of progressive disease, only a minority experience associated liver-related morbidity. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease is considered a complex disease trait that occurs when environmental exposures act upon a susceptible polygenic background composed of multiple independent modifiers. Recent advances include the identification of PNPLA3 as a modifier of disease outcome across the full spectrum of NAFLD from steatosis to advanced fibrosis and hepatocellular carcinoma; and the discovery of TM6SF2 as a potential “master regulator” of metabolic syndrome outcome, determining not only risk of advanced liver disease, but also cardiovascular disease outcomes. In this article, the authors will review the field, discussing in detail the current status of research into these important genetic modifiers of NAFLD progression.

Serum lipidomics reveals early differential effects of gastric bypass compared to banding on... Serum lipidomics reveals early differential effects of gastric bypass compared to banding on...

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Date added: 02/03/2018
Date modified: 02/03/2018
Filesize: 256 Bytes
Downloads: 310

"Serum lipidomics reveals early differential effects of gastric bypass compared to banding on phospholipids and sphingolipids independent of differences in weight loss"

Background/Objectives:
Circulating phospholipids and sphingolipids are implicated in obesity-related comorbidities such as insulin resistance and cardiovascular disease. How bariatric surgery affects these important lipid markers is poorly understood. We sought to determine whether Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB), which is associated with greater metabolic improvement, differentially affects the phosphosphingolipidome compared with adjustable gastric banding (AGB).

Subjects/Methods:
Fasting sera were available from 59 obese women (body mass index range 37–51 kg m−2; n=37 RYGB and 22 AGB) before surgery, then at 1 (21 RYGB, 12 AGB) and 3 months follow-up (19 RYGB, 12 AGB). HPLC-MS/MS was used to quantify 131 lipids from nine structural classes. DXA measurements and laboratory parameters were also obtained. The associations between lipids and clinical measurements were studied with P-values adjusted for the false discovery rate (FDR).

Results:
Both surgical procedures rapidly induced weight loss and improved clinical profiles, with RYGB producing better improvements in fat mass, and serum total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C) and orosomucoid (FDR <10%). Ninety-three (of 131) lipids were altered by surgery—the majority decreasing—with 29 lipids differentially affected by RYGB during the study period. The differential effect of the surgeries remained statistically significant for 20 of these lipids after adjusting for differences in weight loss between surgery types. The RYGB signature consisted of phosphatidylcholine species not exceeding 36 carbons, and ceramides and sphingomyelins containing C22 to C25 fatty acids. RYGB also led to a sustained increase in unsaturated ceramide and sphingomyelin species. The RYGB-specific lipid changes were associated with decreases in body weight, total and LDL-C, orosomucoid and increased HOMA-S (FDR <10%).

Conclusions:
Concomitant with greater metabolic improvement, RYGB induced early and sustained changes in phosphatidylcholines, sphingomyelins and ceramides that were independent of greater weight loss. These data suggest that RYGB may specifically alter sphingolipid metabolism, which, in part, could explain the better metabolic outcomes of this surgical procedure.

Serum endotrophin identifies optimal responders to PPARγ agonists in type 2 diabetes Serum endotrophin identifies optimal responders to PPARγ agonists in type 2 diabetes

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Date added: 03/05/2017
Date modified: 03/05/2017
Filesize: 491.44 kB
Downloads: 509

Aims/hypothesis

The treatment of type 2 diabetes with full peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) agonists improves insulin sensitivity, but is associated with weight gain, heart failure, peripheral oedema and bone loss. Endotrophin, the C-terminal fragment of the α3 chain of procollagen type VI (also called Pro-C6), is involved in both adipose tissue matrix remodelling and metabolic control. We established a serum assay for endotrophin to assess if this novel adipokine could identify type 2 diabetic patients who respond optimally to PPARγ agonists, improving the risk-to-benefit ratio.

Methods

The BALLET trial (NCT00515632) compared the glucose-lowering effects and safety of the partial PPARγ agonist balaglitazone with those of pioglitazone in individuals with type 2 diabetes on stable insulin therapy. The per protocol population (n = 297) was stratified into tertiles based on baseline endotrophin levels. Participants were followed-up after 26 weeks, after which correlational analysis was carried out between endotrophin levels and measures of glucose control. This is a secondary post hoc analysis.

Results

Endotrophin was significantly associated with therapeutic response to balaglitazone and pioglitazone. At week 26, only individuals in the upper two tertiles showed significant reductions in HbA1c and fasting serum glucose compared with baseline. The OR for a 1% and a 0.5% reduction in HbA1c for individuals in the upper two tertiles were 3.83 (95% CI 1.62, 9.04) p < 0.01, and 3.85 (95% CI 1.94, 7.61) p < 0.001, respectively. Endotrophin levels correlated with adipose tissue mass, insulin resistance and fatty liver index. Notably, PPARγ-associated adverse effects, such as moderate-to-severe lower extremity oedema, only occurred in the lower tertile.

Conclusions/interpretation

Elevated endotrophin serum levels predict response to two insulin sensitisers and reduce the risk of associated adverse effects, thereby, identifying patients with type 2 diabetes who may profit from PPARγ agonist treatment.

Role of Adipose Tissue Insulin Resistance in the Natural History of T2DM: Results From the San... Role of Adipose Tissue Insulin Resistance in the Natural History of T2DM: Results From the San...

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Date added: 03/10/2018
Date modified: 03/10/2018
Filesize: 256 Bytes
Downloads: 231

"Role of Adipose Tissue Insulin Resistance in the Natural History of T2DM: Results From the San Antonio Metabolism Study"

In the transition from normal glucose tolerance (NGT) to type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), the role of b-cell dysfunction and peripheral insulin resistance (IR) is well established. However, the impact of dysfunctional adipose tissue has not been fully elucidated. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of resistance to the antilipolytic effect of insulin (adipose tissue IR [Adipo-IR]) in a large group of subjects with NGT, impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), and T2DM.

PNPLA3 and obesity: a synergistic relationship in NAFLD PNPLA3 and obesity: a synergistic relationship in NAFLD

Date added: 05/27/2018
Date modified: 05/27/2018
Filesize: 256 Bytes
Downloads: 36

NAFLD, the hepatic manifestation of the metabolic syndrome, is a multifactorial condition — environmental factors influence an inherited genetic risk. Stender et al. now describe the additive effect of obesity and NAFLD-associated genetic polymorphisms on steatosis, elevated serum alanine aminotransferase levels and cirrhosis, remarkably illustrating the principle of gene–environment interactions.

Refers to Stender, S. et al. Adiposity amplifies the genetic risk of fatty liver disease conferred by multiple loci. Nat. Genet. 49, 842–847 (2017)

Plasma DNA methylation: A potential biomarker for stratification of liver fibrosis in NAFLD Plasma DNA methylation: A potential biomarker for stratification of liver fibrosis in NAFLD

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Date added: 05/22/2016
Date modified: 09/27/2016
Filesize: 2.77 MB
Downloads: 757

Liver biopsy is currently the most reliable way of evaluating liver fibrosis in patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Its inherent risks limit its widespread use. Differential liver DNA methylation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) gene promoter has recently been shown to stratify patients in terms of fibrosis severity but requires access to liver tissue. The aim of this study was to assess whether DNA methylation of circulating DNA could be detected in human plasma and potentially used to stratify liver fibrosis severity in patients with NAFLD.

Phosphorylated IGFBP-1 as a non-invasive predictor of liver fat in NAFLD Phosphorylated IGFBP-1 as a non-invasive predictor of liver fat in NAFLD

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Date added: 01/10/2017
Date modified: 01/10/2017
Filesize: 505.25 kB
Downloads: 581

Insulin-like growth factor binding protein 1 (IGFBP-1) is a potentially interesting marker for liver fat in NAFLD as it is exclusively produced by the liver, and insulin is its main regulator. We determined whether measurement of fasting serum phosphorylated IGFBP-1 (fS-pIGFBP-1) helps to predict liver fat compared to routinely available clinical parameters and PNPLA3 genotype at rs738409. Liver fat content (proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy) was measured in 378 subjects (62% women, age 43 [30–54] years, BMI 32.7 [28.1–39.7] kg/m2, 46% with NAFLD). Subjects were randomized to discovery and validation groups, which were matched for clinical and biochemical parameters and PNPLA3 genotype. Multiple linear regression and Random Forest modeling were used to identify predictors of liver fat. The final model, % Liver Fat Equation’, included age, fS-pIGFBP-1, S-ALT, waist-to-hip ratio, fP-Glucose and fS-Insulin (adjusted R2 = 0.44 in the discovery group, 0.49 in the validation group, 0.47 in all subjects). The model was significantly better than a model without fS-pIGFBP-1 or S-ALT or S-AST alone. Random Forest modeling identified fS-p-IGFBP-1 as one of the top five predictors of liver fat (adjusted R2 = 0.39). Therefore, measurement of fS-pIGFBP-1 may help in non-invasive prediction of liver fat content.

Peripheral Insulin Resistance Predicts Liver Damage in Diabetic Subjects with NAFLD Peripheral Insulin Resistance Predicts Liver Damage in Diabetic Subjects with NAFLD

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Date added: 12/07/2015
Date modified: 11/07/2016
Filesize: 256 Bytes
Downloads: 1514

BACKGROUND & AIMS:

Surrogate indexes of insulin resistance/sensitivity (IR/IS) are widely used in Non Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease (NAFLD) although they have never been validated in this population. We aimed to validate the available indexes in NAFLD subjects and to test their ability to predict liver damage also in comparison with NAFLD Fibrosis Score (NFS).

METHODS:

Surrogate indexes were validated by tracer technique (D2-glucose and U-13C-glucose) in the basal state and during an Oral Glucose Tolerance Test (OGTT). The best performing indexes were used in an independent cohort of 145 non-diabetic NAFLD subjects to identify liver damage (fibrosis and NASH).

RESULTS:

In the validation NAFLD cohort, HOMA-IR, IGR and ISI Stumvoll had the best association with hepatic IR, while peripheral IS was most significantly related to OGIS, ISI Stumvoll and eMCRnodem . In the independent cohort, only OGTT derived indexes were associated with liver damage and OGIS was the best predictor of significant (≥F2) fibrosis (OR=0.76, 95% CI= 0.61-0.96, P=0.0233) and of NASH (OR=0.75, 95% CI=0.63-0.90, P=0.0021). Both OGIS and NFS identified advanced (F3/F4) fibrosis, but OGIS predicted it better than NFS (OR=0.57, 95% CI=0.45-0.72, P<0.001) and was also able to discriminate F2 from F3/F4 (P<0.003).

CONCLUSIONS:

OGIS is associated with peripheral IS in NAFLD and is inversely associated with an increased risk of significant/advanced liver damage in non-diabetic subjects with NAFLD.